Google Chrome

As you may have heard Google Chrome (Chrome) went live yesterday. The Chrome team also released a comic explaining some of the innovations and ideas around Chrome.

After installing Chrome the first impression I got was it’s a very slim-line and compact browser. The UI reflects this totally. There isn’t the usual File menu above (personally I don’t think it’s needed in a browser anyway) and tabbing is at the very top. The Omnibox, Chrome’s address bar, is very dominant and a very powerful. Much like Vista start search feature you don’t have to remember where things are — just search for it. The default search engine of the Omnibox does not have to be Google either, use “Options -> Basics -> Default search” to change it.

I really like the Application shortcuts feature. Many a time I have wanted a shortcut on my desktop which opens up a web application much like a desktop app does. I know you could create a lnk file and place that on the deskopt but somehow it doesn’t feel good. When you create an application shortcut however it creates for you a special shortcut which opens up Chrome in an even slimmer interface that looks just like a standard desktop application. It is excellent when used in twine with GMail.

Gmail in Google Chrome

Chrome is a muti-threaded browser, that means each instance (new tab, new window, plugin, javascript etc) runs a separate process, it sounds like a wasteful approach but quite a fascinating concept as explained in the comic. It uses the tried and tested WebKit engine for rendering web pages and the V8 JavaScript engine. V8 is a high performance engine written in C++ which compiles and executes JavaScript code. All are open source projects so not an inch of propreitary code inside!

I think Google is on to a winner, if not, they have once again set the bar higher for others to compete against.

6 Comments

  1. Freda Salatino at

    Yes, it's lightweight and very fast — encouraging! But it only seems to support a subset of HTML. Old friends like hot zones and DL statements are gone; a favorite web site that I helped design (using very plain vanilla HTML) not looks like dreck (it's a technical term).

    Will Google provide specific information about which elements of standard HTML, CSS, and XML, Chrome will not support?

  2. Freda Salatino at

    Yes, it's lightweight and very fast — encouraging! But it only seems to support a subset of HTML. Old friends like hot zones and DL statements are gone; a favorite web site that I helped design (using very plain vanilla HTML) now looks like dreck (it's a technical term).

    Will Google provide specific information about which elements of standard HTML, CSS, and XML, Chrome will not support?

  3. I too am very impressed by Chrome, it's blazingly fast! What's also nice is that developer's debugging tools are built in… though I wonder if it's better as a plugin like FireBug.

    Safari is also fast but because of security issues, I refuse to install it. With Chrome however, I feel totally safe, and will be making it my browser of choice!

    All that's needed now is a header inspector and an adblock plus!

  4. caphun at

    Hi Freda,

    Chrome certainly supports DL. This should demonstrate that – http://yelotofu.com/demo/dl-form-layout.html

    Chrome uses the Webkit engine so anything that is supported by Webkit should be supported by Chrome aswell. So your best bet is to delve into Webkit.org and see what they're not supporting.

    I haven't seen any HTML hick-ups like you have so far but will continue testing. Thanks!

  5. caphun at

    Hi Huy,

    Aren't you a Mac & Linux geek? How are you running Chrome? Or did you compile from source? Just interested to know :)

  6. David Gerard at

    "We are so, so happy with Google Chrome," mumbled Mozilla CEO John Lilly through gritted teeth. "That most of our income is from Google has no bearing on me making this statement." http://notnews.today.com/?p=57